SouthGlenn

The owners and architects of the Streets at SouthGlenn wanted to replicate the ambiance of old-world fountains in ancient cities. Working closely with Colorado Hardscapes, the architects at SEM/CommArts designed extremely large concrete fountain bowls. To prevent damage from freeze-thaw, chemicals and coins, therefore, the bowls required casting monolithically. They developed an edge and pattern for the bowls that would produce the desired water-flow effect and a structural form that could support the weight.

The largest challenge to overcome was the transportation of the largest bowl (twenty feet wide). Colorado Hardscapes Crews built a platform on-site and formed the bowl mold in the air around the center support column. The large bowl was cast and finished in place. Completed by a large and efficient crew working together in hot weather, a small space, and a short time frame. The smaller bowls, cast off-site and then stacked in place by a crane.

The large fountain was the first of its kind to be cast-in-place utilizing GFRC products and methods to form a bowl, place the concrete, and finish it while in position over ten feet in the air.  The fountains are modern-day marvels that duplicate the timeworn polished stone of ancient fountains. Due in part to an Arcustone crushed limestone coating bonded to concrete. Multi-colored mosaic tiles in patinated greens and browns project the level of artistic detail found in an aged European fountain. Built with state-of-the-art hydraulics, water treatment, and lighting. This fountain competes with some of the most modern fountains today in innovation.